Gwenda`s Onion Tart with Cumin

When Ernst and I got married in Germany 36 years ago, Onion Tart (or Zwiebelkuchen) was the very first recipe I requested from an old German lady who served it with great confidence to her customers and friends. Ernst studied in Schwabenland, a wine-growing region in South-Central Germany around Stuttgart, where the people speak a specific German dialect - which Ernst naturally picked up and still speaks to perfection. During the grape harvest in Fall, the Schwaben serve onion tart with a young, fresh, unfiltered white wine, called Federweisser.

A typical Schwabish onion tart is baked in a flat rectangular baking tin (2-3 cm deep) and served in squares. The recipe I obtained form the old lady years ago has become a firm favourite of our family and it gives me great pleasure to share it with you!

Photography by Tasha Seccombe 

Photography by Tasha Seccombe 

For the pastry:

  • 250 g cake flour (or all-purpose)
  • 180 g cold butter, diced
  • 2,5 ml (1/2 teaspoon) salt
  • 30-45 ml (3-4 tablespoons) iced water

For the filling:

  • 4-5 large brown/white onions, peeled
  • 30 ml (2 tablespoons) extra virgin olive oil
  • 200 g Mozzarella cheese, roughly grated
  • 250 ml (1 cup) fresh cream
  • 3 XL eggs
  • a pinch of salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 2,5 ml (1/2 teaspoon) cumin seeds (or aniseed)

Method:

For the pastry: Place the flour, butter & salt in a food processor and pulse until it resembles rough breadcrumbs. With the motor running, add the water one tablespoon at a time until it just starts to come together in a ball. Remove from the processor, press together in a smooth ball, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

For the filling: While the pastry is chilling, preheat the oven to 220 C (425 F). Slice the onions horizontally into 1cm thick slices. Place on a lined baking tray, drizzle with olive oil, then season lightly with salt & pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, then remove from the oven. Carefully turn each sliced of onion over - they should be darker on the bottoms. Set aside.

For assembly: On a floured surface, roll out the pastry with a rolling pin to a thickness of about 3 mm. Line a greased tart tin (about 27 cm diameter x 3 cm deep) with the pastry and neatly trim the edges. Bake blind for 10 minutes then remove from the oven. Spread out the grated cheese on the bottom of the pastry. Arrange the roasted onion slices tightly all over. Whisk the cream and eggs with a pinch of salt & pepper, then pour the mixture all over the onions. Sprinkle with cumin seeds, then return to the oven for about 30 minutes or until golden brown and cooked. 

Serve warm with chilled, fresh, dry white wine – my personal favourite for this very special onion tart is the Ernst Gouws & Co Chenin Blanc.  Serves 6 as a light meal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heaven in Waterkant

We dream, we cook, we travel, we eat well and invite you to join us. This is the introduction one can find on the Hemelhuijs website, yet few have ever described the Gouws way of life more concisely. Ezanne was strolling up Waterkant street in Cape Town when she noticed the interior design of a restaurant that was so inspiring she could not dare pass it. Entering the Hemelhuijs, she was immediately swept away by the beauty of the hand-made homeware that decorates the walls, the sense of awe that resonates through the plates that passed her, and the service that carried it. Having an eye not only for design, but also for business, she immediately introduced our copper-foiled labels to the ever-smiling Elizna and the rest of it is history; they’ve been both customers and friends of ours ever since.

Our pairing of the month is the Ernst Gouws & Co Chardonnay 2016 and Hemelhuijs homemade potato rösti with crème fraiche, soft poached free-range eggs and bacon. This might seem unusual, but that’s only if you are opposed to having wine for breakfast. Or rather wine with breakfast, as Hemelhuijs serves theirs all day. A favourite of Ernst jnr. when he’s out in Cape Town doing trade visits, he describes the partnership as follows:

“Our Chardonnay is what I describe as lightly-oaked – it’s right in between those old, heavily buttered wines and the unwooded ones that are currently so popular. The wood has basically just rounded off the wine’s natural acidity, leaving you with that soft mouthfeel and lots of fruit. The wine works incredibly well with the potato rösti, because the crème fraiche further balances out the wine’s acidity and the dish’s general creaminess enhances the fruit component even more. It’s really a match made in heaven.”

Follow Hemelhuijs

Visit their website: www.hemelhuijs.co.za and give them a like on Facebook: facebook.com/hemelhuijs

House of H

“This is my house and in here I do what I want” – the mantra of Heinrich Koen; owner, operator and chef of what must arguably be Loop street’s coolest spot, House Of H. Not far removed is Ernst snr’s outlook of “I make wines that I like to drink and nothing else” and maybe that’s why we get along so well with the Koen family. Shared values of honest food, family and not going with the flow.

We love going here, because it always feels like it’s been too long and H is always on hand to show you the most aged cuts, his sixteen-hour brisket or just to grab a drink with.

On that topic of drinks, have an Ernst Gouws & Co Shiraz 2014 with the 42-day, dry-aged, organic ribeye which is flame-grilled and served with hand-cut chips. You won't be disappointed.

Follow House of H

www.houseofh.co.za, Instagram - @houseofh_112loop

SWF Welcomes a New Generation

The 2017 Stellenbosch Wine Festival yet again proved itself to be South Africa’s premier event of its kind. This year Ernst Gouws & Co decided to re-enter the festival with a renewed vigour, focusing on creating an experience for festival-goers instead of just showcasing our wines. The offering was incredibly well received and we had a record amount of feet at our stand. 

 

We wanted two things from SWF this year; people to spend as much time with us as possible and to leave with something once they had done so. So, a mini festival area and a straw hat it was! While it was free to spend time with us, which we really should also have charged for, our hats came at a two-bottle price tag. It was a raging success and by Saturday evening we had completely run out of stock, Ernst snr making desperate attempts on Sunday morning to fill the supplies again. Our festival-within-a-festival consisted of harvest bins, black boards, and black board tables, where people sat around and got very, very creative for hours at a time.

We wanted two things from SWF this year; people to spend as much time with us as possible and to leave with something once they had done so. So, a mini festival area and a straw hat it was! While it was free to spend time with us, which we really should also have charged for, our hats came at a two-bottle price tag. It was a raging success and by Saturday evening we had completely run out of stock, Ernst snr making desperate attempts on Sunday morning to fill the supplies again. Our festival-within-a-festival consisted of harvest bins, black boards, and black board tables, where people sat around and got very, very creative for hours at a time.

The 2015 Chardonnay stood out over the weekend, with the 2016 Sauvignon blanc and 2016 Chenin blanc following shortly on its heels. We imagine that the cooler weather on Saturday increased the Chardonnay sales, due to its lower acidity and softer mouthfeel. It is after all a very elegant wine, being unlike other wooded Chardonnays in the sense that it is only lightly aged in French oak. The 2016 is soon to be released, so keep your eyes peeled on our social media channels.

We’ll definitely be back for the 2018 Stellenbosch Wine Festival and will most certainly have a few more tricks up our sleeve.

Shop Online for Chardonnay, Sauvignon blanc or Chenin blanc.

OUT OF OUR KITCHEN

Mosbolletjies - Ouma Rina Gouws

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 liter strong fermenting must, (2/3 days old).
  • 4.5 kg cake flour
  • 500 gr butter
  • 500 ml lukewarm water
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 10 ml salt
  • 30 ml whole aniseed optional

Method:

  1. Mix flour and aniseed in a mixing bowl.       
  2. Blend sugar, melted butter, water and salt.
  3. Add butter, water, sugar and salt mixture to the flour and aniseed.
  4. Add the must slowly until the dough is wet mixture.   Dough must not be too soft.
  5. Add lukewarm water if you need more fluid.
  6. Knead 30 – 40 minutes.
  7. Cover the mixing bowl with a blanket or towel and leave to rise overnight. 
  8. Do not knead down the following morning.
  9. Form small balls and place against each other in loaf pan.
  10. Allow rising again, 3 times the original size in lukewarm conditions.
  11. Place in oven at 180˚C for 1.5 hours until golden brown and cooked.
  12. Turn out onto wire racks, then brush immediately with sugar water.
  13. Leave to cool slightly, then eat warm or break into pieces and dry out in a cool oven at 70 ˚C overnight.

OUT OF OUR KITCHEN

Jamila teaching me how to make Chapati

Ingredients

  • 5 cups all-purpose flour (not self-rising)
  • 2 cups hot milk
  • 1 ½ tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • ½ cup Canola/Vegetable oil
  • 2 cups Extra flour for kneading
  • 1 tsp cardamom pips - grounded

Method

#1:  Roll thinner than 1/4 centimeters.

#1:  Roll thinner than 1/4 centimeters.

#2:  Brush oil on top

#2:  Brush oil on top

  1. In a large mixing bowl, measure 5 cups of flour.
  2. In another bowl, mix salt, 3 tbsp of oil, 1 ½ cup of hot milk, cardamom and salt.
  3. Add the above milk mixture to the flour. Mix well until dough becomes soft.
  4. Knead the dough for 10 – 15 minutes; add flour or water if needed.
  5. Separate in 10 balls and cover with plastic wrap.

Rolling

1.       Roll one part of the dough thinner than ¼ centimetres, as per above photo.

2.       Brush oil on top (as per photo)

3.       At the side that face you, make one centimetre fold, then roll forward with both two hands; almost like you are rolling a rode away from your direction. (watch video) It should look like a rope.

#4:  Create coil like shape

#4:  Create coil like shape

4.       Then create a coil-like shape 

5.       Then return it to the same place and cover.

6.       Repeat until you finish the rest.

7.        After you are done with the above, take the first part that you rolled.

8.        With a rolling pin, roll each ball in a nice round flat shape that is about ¼ centimetres thin.

 

Frying

  1. Heat a non-stick pan on medium heat (use a round pancake pan). After it is heated, sprinkle a few drops of water on it. If the drops dry right away, the pan is ready for chapati.
  2. Place the chapati you have just rolled on a heated pan. After about a minute, check the bottom of the chapati, if it is golden brown, and the top is translucent, flip it over.

  3. Brush a little bit of oil on the top of the chapati, then check to see if the bottom is cooked and is golden brown.

  4. If yes, flip the chapati over again, now brush the oil on the second side of the chapati, and turn it over again.

  5. After about 30 seconds remove the chapati from the pan and put it on a plate and cover with a foil paper.

  6. Repeat until you finish the rest.

Serve with:
• Ernst Gouws & Co Pinotage, Vegetables & Meat

 

Sante Jamila!

Ezanne

GWENDA`S STORIES

Hot Potting in China

Ernst and Gwenda sharing a hot pot with our importer, Michael from Jiangxi Imports in China.  

Ernst and Gwenda sharing a hot pot with our importer, Michael from Jiangxi Imports in China.  

 

For those of you not familiar with the concept of the hot pot, it is the Asian version of fondue. In China hot pots differ from region to region, almost like the speaking of different dialects.  The base is a heated pot standing on a burner in the middle of the table with, simmering with a broth of choice. Different kinds of meat, mostly chicken, pork or beef, which has been cut into small bite size portions as well as vegetables or fish, will be passed around.  Guests will pick their choice and put it into the cooking broth until it is ready.  Different sauces, ranging from spicy hot to really hot, will add flavour to the cooked food.  The meat and vegetables dishes will be served before the fish. A special meal can consist solely out of mushroom (serving a variety of mushrooms cooked in this way).  Gwenda once shared a mushroom hot pot where the broth was made from cooking a turtle which was served right at the end of the meal. Needless to say, it came as a complete surprise and unfortunately by then, she no longer had an appetite.  Apart from the different versions of hot pot, there is one universal rule —you don't "hot pot" when you don’t know what is being served.  

Hot Pot Lamb Recipe

Suggested Dipping Sauces

  •  Soy Sauce
  • ·Sesame Paste
  • ·Preserved (fermented) bean curd
  • ·Chili Oil
  • Hoisin Sauce
  • Red Rice Vinegar

 

Ingredients

  •  6 cups lamb or chicken stock
  • ·1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • ·1 Slice ginger
  • ·2 Green onions
  • ·1 kg boneless lamb
  •  1 - 2 Cakes bean curd
  • ·0.5 kg green vegetables, such as Chinese cabbage, bok choy, or spinach
  • · 100 grams bean thread (vermicelli) noodles

Method

  1. Cut the lamb into paper thin rectangular slices. Slice the bean curd.
  2. Wash, drain, and chop the vegetables. Prepare any side dishes that you are planning to serve.
  3. Lay the lamb, chopped vegetables, and side dishes on separate platters on the table. Place the dipping sauces on the table in small individual bowls. Make sure each guest has a complete place setting, including a dipping fork (color-coded if possible) and a small bowl for placing the cooked food.
  4. Bring the broth with the dark soy sauce to a boil, and add the ginger and green onion. Transfer enough broth so that the fondue pot is approximately 2/3 - 3/4 full. (How much broth you need will depend on the size of the fondue pot).
  5. ·Place the fondue pot on the burner, and keep it simmering throughout the meal. Keep the remaining broth warming on the stovetop.
  6. To serve, invite guests to spear the food with a dipping fork and cook briefly in the broth until cooked, then dip the cooked food in the sauces as desired.
  7. Use a dipping basket to cook the vegetables in batches in the hot broth and ladle out into the soup bowls. Cook the noodles and serve at the end of the meal.

Enjoy!

Gwenda

OUT OF OUR KITCHEN

Som Tam (Green Papaya Salad)

Travelling to Tanzania in November, I discovered the perfect pairing for our flagship wooded white blend, The Nineteenfiftytwo: Thai food, especially Som Tam (Green Papaya Salad) and Tom Gha Khai (Coconut Chicken Soup).  The creamy spice, caramel aromas of the Semillon and crispy fresh tropical flavours of the Sauvignon Blanc, enhances the authentic tastes of the Thai cuisine.  Thanks to Google I found a lovely recipe from The Muddled Pantry.  The green papaya is available from the New Asian Spice Supermarket in Seapoint, Cape Town.  

Som Tam (Green Papaya Salad):  Serves 2

  • 2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp. roasted peanuts (unsalted), coarsely crushed
  • 2 tbsp. dried prawns (soaked in hot water for 20 minutes), drained
  • 4 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 4 green beans, cut into 1 cm lengths
  • 2-4 bird`s eye chillies, to taste
  • 2 cups shredded green papaya

Dressing:

  • 3 tbsp palm sugar, shaved
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp. lime juice
  • 1 tbsp. tamarind water

Method:  The Dressing

  1. Combine all the dressing ingredients in a microwave-proof bowl
  2. Cook on a high heat for 1 minute, or until the palm sugar is completely dissolved
  3. Allow to cool completely

Method:  The Salad

  1. Using a pestle and mortar, pound the garlic with a pinch of salt
  2. Add the peanuts and dried prawns, pound to a coarse paste.
  3. Next add the cherry tomatoes and beans, pound gently  (the tomatoes may "explode)
  4. Finally, add the green papaya and lightly bruise, all the while turning and tossing the mixture with a spoon held in your other hand.
  5. Moisten the salad with the dressing
  6. Combine thoroughly before serving immediately
     

Enjoy!

Ezanne

WHERE TO ENJOY OUR WINES

Kaas & Wijn Stefaan, Belgium.

http://kaasenwijnstefaan.be/

One of my favourite places to visit in Europe is Belgium.  The Belgians know how to appreciate the finer things in life.  They eat some of the best food, drink the most delicious wines and they certainly know about keeping track with the latest developments in the design world.  I absolutely love the modern simplistic  (and sometimes daring) look of the Belgian interior.  In Kruibeke, a town close to Antwerp our wines get represented by a lovely, young, ambitious sommelier, Stefaan - his wife, Sally and their two daughters.  The girls remind me of my childhood when my sister, Inke and I would fiddle around in the wine tasting room 'serving' customers and being the on-the-spot assistance to mom and dad. A few weeks ago after exhibiting our wines at the annual Prowein exhibition in Germany, I had the privilege of attending Kaas & Wijn Stefaan`s Spring Tasting in Kruibeke, where I was spoiled by their hospitality, good food, cheese and wine.   Stefaan grew up in a family that appreciates good wine and from childhood Stefaan had the opportunity to sample the best French wines and cheeses.  After completing his studies at the Hotel School Koksijde, he worked as a sommelier in Belgium.  In 2005 he was voted "First Sommelier of Belgium" and in 2006, he won the contest "Best Sommelier of Belgium".  In 2010, Stefaan was the runner-up in the World Championships for Sommeliers of South African wines  (WOSA - Sommelier World Cup).  It was also at around this time that Stefaan fell in love with South African wines and ever since then he has been dealing with our wines in a more business-like fashion.   Wife Sally is Stefaan`s right hand.  She helps wherever, whenever needed and also recently received her Master in Cheese.   Down the road from Kaas & Wijn Stefaan, you will find the Camerlinck family restaurant, The Ceder.  The Ceder was established by Stefaan`s parents and today his sister and brother-in-law, Judy and Frederick Schaffrath - Camerlinck run the family restaurant and B&B.  Be sure to book a table ahead of time as bookings need to be made at least two months in advance for a weekend dinner.  A culinary experience not to be missed! Cheers  Ezanne

One of my favourite places to visit in Europe is Belgium.  The Belgians know how to appreciate the finer things in life.  They eat some of the best food, drink the most delicious wines and they certainly know about keeping track with the latest developments in the design world.  I absolutely love the modern simplistic  (and sometimes daring) look of the Belgian interior.  In Kruibeke, a town close to Antwerp our wines get represented by a lovely, young, ambitious sommelier, Stefaan - his wife, Sally and their two daughters.  The girls remind me of my childhood when my sister, Inke and I would fiddle around in the wine tasting room 'serving' customers and being the on-the-spot assistance to mom and dad.

A few weeks ago after exhibiting our wines at the annual Prowein exhibition in Germany, I had the privilege of attending Kaas & Wijn Stefaan`s Spring Tasting in Kruibeke, where I was spoiled by their hospitality, good food, cheese and wine.  

Stefaan grew up in a family that appreciates good wine and from childhood Stefaan had the opportunity to sample the best French wines and cheeses.  After completing his studies at the Hotel School Koksijde, he worked as a sommelier in Belgium.  In 2005 he was voted "First Sommelier of Belgium" and in 2006, he won the contest "Best Sommelier of Belgium".  In 2010, Stefaan was the runner-up in the World Championships for Sommeliers of South African wines  (WOSA - Sommelier World Cup).  It was also at around this time that Stefaan fell in love with South African wines and ever since then he has been dealing with our wines in a more business-like fashion.  

Wife Sally is Stefaan`s right hand.  She helps wherever, whenever needed and also recently received her Master in Cheese.  

Down the road from Kaas & Wijn Stefaan, you will find the Camerlinck family restaurant, The Ceder.  The Ceder was established by Stefaan`s parents and today his sister and brother-in-law, Judy and Frederick Schaffrath - Camerlinck run the family restaurant and B&B.  Be sure to book a table ahead of time as bookings need to be made at least two months in advance for a weekend dinner.  A culinary experience not to be missed!

Cheers 

Ezanne

SMAC ART GALLERY

Opening of Georgina Gratix, Puppy Love.

  We are proud to be associated with SMAC Art Gallery in Stellenbosch and Woodstock, Cape Town.  SMAC represents a number of important established and emerging South African artists as well as international artists, in particular artists from the African continent.  One of the most recent openings in which we were featured was the one for Cape Town-based Georgina Gratrix.  Georgina Gratix is one of the most exciting and innovative young artists on the South African contemporary art scene. For more information on her work please visit http://www.smacgallery.com/artist/georgina-gratrix/.

 

We are proud to be associated with SMAC Art Gallery in Stellenbosch and Woodstock, Cape Town.  SMAC represents a number of important established and emerging South African artists as well as international artists, in particular artists from the African continent. 

One of the most recent openings in which we were featured was the one for Cape Town-based Georgina Gratrix.  Georgina Gratix is one of the most exciting and innovative young artists on the South African contemporary art scene. For more information on her work please visit http://www.smacgallery.com/artist/georgina-gratrix/.

WHERE TO ENJOY OUR WINES

The Perfect Gift for Dad

In combination with Silwood and Hussar Grill we host a monthly steak master class.  The Silwood School of Cookery is South Africa’s oldest cookery school, boasting student achievement unmatched by any other cookery school in the country.  The Hussar Grill restaurant group is one of South Africa`s premier grill rooms serving the best steaks any meat lover can only dream of. 

At our monthly steak master class, chef and grill master Greg Bax will teach you how to cook the perfect Hussar Grill steak as well as a variety of delicious sauces.  Either Ernst senior or junior will pair the wine with the steaks and keep your glasses full throughout the evening while you relax and learn the art of grilling steak to perfection. 

It is a perfect gift for Father’s Day or make a group booking for team building in your company .

2016 Course dates:
21st of July, 4th of August.

Time: 18h30 – 21h30

 Cost: R450 per person

 To bring: Apron

GWENDA`S STORIES

Affairs of the Wooden Plate

The festive season is rapidly approaching and it is time to prepare yourself for a well-deserved rest before making a fresh start in the New Year. It is around this time of the year one thinks about relationships and the joys of life.

We have a very special relationship with our simple wooden plates which we have treasured for many years but sometimes take for granted and fall out of love with. The love affair began 40 years ago when Ernst arrived in Germany and was introduced to his first "vessperbrett" as the Schwaebian folk of Germany know them. As young student from South Africa working the vineyards in his spare time to earn the extras, it was love at first sight – breakfast was cold meats and cheeses and freshly baked bread served from a round wooden plate at 9:00 am in the morning – all washed down with a glass of wine. Lunch and early-supper to follow served from the same plate. The inter-personal student relationship was close and comforting and they spent morning, noon and night together. Communication was intense and open – they understood each other's joys and sorrows and a relationship was born in blood, sweat and tears.

Gwenda visited four years later as a newly graduated and excited to be with her high school sweetheart. She was introduced to Ernst's closest companion – the wooden plate ... the circle of friends grew.

Moving to South Africa seemed to be no problem. As the family grew and friends became regulars in the Gouws home, we needed more wooden plates which were only be available in Germany around that time. Wine business trips to Germany became shopping excursions too.

Meanwhile life got busy and the dishwasher interfering sent the relationship plummeting. Familiarity turned to indifference. White became the fashion. We forgot about the comfort and warmth of natural wood – the relationship seemed doomed.

Until recently, when old friends became regulars at the dinner table once more. The grandchildren forced us to look at our beloved friends in a different way and we rediscovered the warmth and friendship built over 40 odd years. A few took some serious battering through the years, but are even more charming in their old age. Sometimes it is just for somebody else to tell you how precious familiar things are.

Like the revival of the wooden plates, the new modern circular design of the Ernst Gouws & Co label proved to be a great success and many old friends rediscovered our wines this year.

The cooperation between us, parents and the younger generation is fruitful and rewarding. Ezanne and Ernst Junior's enthusiasm and initiatives open new doors daily and although we battle many times to keep track with the latest technologies of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, their input and knowledge is invaluable. However, the style of our wines remains typical of what Ernst is known for and gained reputation over many years – lots of fruit with a long finish – easy to enjoy with food or just as is, on its own.

We thank each and every one for keeping contact and being part of our lives especially those who joined the circle of friends recently.

 May you all experience the joy and comfort of true friendship! Cheers to life!

Gwenda

OUT OF OUR KITCHEN

Meatballs and eggs, in a rich tomato sauce  -  by Tayfun Aras

Ingredients:

Sauce:  

6 ripe tomatoes or 2 cans peeled and diced tomatoes
1 med onion  
2 clove garlic
1 tsp each: Oregano,sugar,paprika,black pepper,salt

Meatballs

500 gr beef mince
1 small onion
1 clove garlic
half a cup bread crumbs
salt & black pepper
chilli flakes
2 tbs cumin

 

Method:

Sauce

Grate or finely chop onions and fry in part olive oil, part butter until they are golden brown, add finely chopped garlic, stir in the tomatoes and spices and let it cook on low heat until it becomes thick.

Meatballs

Grate onion,mash the garlic and mix all ingredients well in a bowl.  Rest the mixture for 20 minutes, knead again and form round meatballs first and flatten them later so they can grill or fry evenly.  Fry or grill the meatballs and add them immediately to the tomato sauce.  Whatever juice left from the meatballs in the frying pan also add to the sauce.  Cook 5 minutes together and make pockets in the sauce and crack eggs in those pockets.  (I put  a lid over the pan so eggs can be  cooked whole).  

Serve with ciabatta bread and enjoy it.

As a side dish you can serve plain thick yoghurt or cucumber; tomato salad with lemon juice and olive oil.

I use more chillie for myself but any ingredient can be adjusted.

Hope you enjoy it. 

Tayfun Aras
ANATOLI TURKISH RESTAURANT
24 Napier Street, Green Point, 8005

 

GWENDA`S STORIES

WINTER IN THE BOLAND

To celebrate the joy of living we share with you the allure of winter in the Boland – rain, cold, long evenings in front of the fireplace, hearty soups and venison; as the hunting season is upon us.

IMG_0006.JPG

For the past 15 years the two  men in our lives - Ernst senior and Ernst junior (now 26) have escaped the cold, wet weather of the Boland on their annual father and son hunting trip.  It is not so much about hunting antelope but more about the many hours planning; the padkos, the journey of 10 hours in the bakkie (truck) to the north and the 4 – 5 days spent in the natural beauty that is Namibia.  Approximately 100 kilometres past Viooldrif (the border between South Africa and Namibia) they have, over the years, assembled a heap of stones which they call their monument.  Every year they stop at the same spot along the road in the middle of nowhere to stretch their legs and to finish off the last bit of padkos and empty the coffee flasks.   And every year they add another big stone to their secret heap and will sometimes even bring with a stone from the Boland.  They never forget to send a photo to the most important ladies in their lives whom they seemingly, miss very much.  Of course, there is always a very good reason why we are not invited.  Their main excuse – we have no interest in hunting and therefore do not want to come with!  So why bother asking! 

 When they return home – never let it be said that the fruits of their labour goes unappreciated – venison, biltong and boerewors to be handed out to all neighbours, family and friends.

We celebrate all our fathers and fathers-to-be in the hunting fields of South Africa and Namibia and wish all fathers a very special Father’s Day.  May you be spoilt rotten and loved to pieces!

 Cheers to the fathers

 The Gouws ladies

OUT OF OUR KITCHEN

ELAND FILLET WITH LAMB AND PORK BRAWN - by Pasch du Plooy from Dutch East Restaurant, Franschhoek

            For the Eland fillet you will need

            1 150g eland fillet 

            2 cloves garlic fresh, crushed

            2 bay leaves

            4 leaves sage

            4 knobs of butter

For the curried pork and lamb brawn you will need

            6 pig’s trotters

            2 whole springbok necks

            1 yellow onion, quartered

            2 carrots, diced

            4 whole cloves

            6 black peppercorns

            12 allspice berries

            4 tablespoons fresh coriander, finely chopped

            Salt and pepper for seasoning

            1 cup sweet mild curry paste

HOW TO MAKE THE BRAWN

Clean the trotters thoroughly of all hairs. Add the all meat, vegetables and spices to a large pressure cooker. Cover with 2.5 liters of cold water. Bring the pressure cooker to full pressure and cook for 60 minutes. Allow the pressure cooker to depressurize and the meat to cool until it can be handled. Strain the stock and remove the vegetables, spices and meat. Remove the skin and all the bones from the trotters.  Remove all the meat from the lamb neck. Chop the meat coarsely.

 Add the strained stock to a large pot and bring to the boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the liquid by half. Add the meat and stir in the curry paste. Season with salt and pepper. Continue to boil the brawn for another 15 minutes then add the chopped coriander.  Pour the brawn into a large terrine mold, set and slice before serving

HOW TO MAKE THE FILLET

Heat a cast iron pan till almost smoking hot. Brush you fillet portion with herb infused olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Sear the fillet in the pan till brown on both sides, about 60 seconds on each side without moving it. Now add the herbs and butter to the pan and finish in very warm oven for 5 minutes basting with the heated butter every minute or so.

TO PLATE

Garnish with truffled potato croquettes, confit pearl onions, sautéed wild mushrooms, pickled carrot coulis and red wine jus.

OUT OF OUR KITCHEN

Maggie`s Malva Pudding - The Original (as published by Michael Olivier)

Our family pays special tribute to our dearest friend, Maggie Pepler who would have turned 89 years of age on May the 1st.  She was not only a friend but in many instances a mother to many.  She taught us about caring for those who have less, how to enjoy the small simple things in life, to appreciate nature and to be non-judgemental.  Her cooking and Wednesday morning classes will long be remembered by the few who had the privileged to attend.  Maggie was the inventor of the now well known Malva pudding which is legendary in South Africa and after 50 years, feature on most restaurant desert menus.  Many diversions of the original recipe have been tested but without a doubt, the original as Maggie has written it down, proofed to be the best.  Serve with thin homemade custard and ice cream. 

For the batter:  250 ml flour, 15 ml bicarbonate of soda, 250 ml sugar, 1 egg, 15 ml apricot jam, 15 ml vinegar, 15 ml melted butter, 250 ml milk.

For the sauce:  125 ml cream, 125 ml milk, 250 ml sugar, 125 ml hot water, 125 g butter.

Method:  Preheat oven at 180°C.  Grease, with butter, an ovenproof glass or porcelain container, approximately 30cm x 20cm x 5cm.  Do not use an aluminium, enamel or any metal container.  Cut a piece of aluminium foil large enough to cover dish during baking and grease it well with butter on one side.  

Sift the flour and the bicarb into a bowl and stir in the sugar.  In another bowl beat the egg very well and add the remaining ingredients  (excluding those for the sauce)  one by one, beating well between each addition.  Using a wooden spoon beat the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix well.  Pour the batter into the prepared baking dish, cover with the foil, greased side down and bake for 45 minutes in the present oven until well risen and brown and for a further five minutes without the foil if not sufficiently brown.  If not sufficiently baked the dessert will not absorb all the sauce thus making it stodgy.  When the pudding is almost done, heat the ingredients for the sauce, ensuring that you melt all the sugar and butter.  When the pudding is cooked, remove from the oven, take off the foil and pour over the sauce.  The pudding will absorb all the sauce.  Serve hot with a little thin cream or vanilla custard. Best served warm or at room temperature, though warm is best.

Serves 6